Sleep tips for health & wellness

It’s a fact that most of us don’t get enough sleep and we know that insufficient sleep can have a variety of negative impacts on our health. So now, with the threat of a novel coronavirus and the stress caused by the pandemic situation, getting enough sleep is even more important. Sleep is essential to the proper functioning of our immune systems and helps mitigate the effects of stress on our body and mind. We’re here to provide you with some of our best tips to help you get enough sleep to support your mind and body.

1. Limit screen time

There is no shortage of scientific evidence showing that the blue light generated by electronics like tablets, smart phones, laptops, and TVs disrupts our sleep even for a while after we’ve turned them off. The best ways to eliminate that threat to our sleep is to keep all screens out of the bedroom and limit the time you spend on them before bed time. Ideally, it’s best to turn those screens off at least 30 minutes before bed – an hour is even better.

2. Create a bedtime routine

Try to create a bedtime routine for yourself. Start it at the same time each night and repeat the same steps. It doesn’t have to be complicated but you need to do it consistently. Having a consistent bedtime routine over time primes your body and mind for sleep. Your body and mind know sleep is coming when you start this routine and they’re ready for it. This makes it easier for you to fall asleep at night.

3. Practice good sleep hygiene

Removing the screens is part of this but there is more to good sleep hygiene, which essentially refers to keeping an appropriate sleep environment. For example, our bodies are programmed to sleep best in the dark. So getting your bedroom as dark as you are able to is important. The climate in your room also makes a difference. Our bodies prefer cooler ambient temperatures for sleeping – between 60 & 67 degrees F. That doesn’t mean that you can’t snuggle up under some fluffy blankets, it just means that you shouldn’t have your room super warm as well. Keeping an appropriate room temperature makes it less likely that you will wake up because you are uncomfortable.

4. Practice gratitude

One of the exercises that I give my clients who often struggle to get to sleep at night is writing a nightly gratitude list. Each night before bed, simply write down 5-10 things you are grateful for that day. The practice of doing this takes your mind out of the muck and mire of stress and puts you in a more relaxed place so it’s easier to get to sleep.

5. Get all the junk out of your head

Another exercise I give my clients who struggle with sleep is a to-do list brain dump. If you are the type who lies down and finds their mind racing or wakes up at 2 am worrying about forgetting to do something tomorrow, this is a great trick for you. Before you head to bed for the night, write down everything you need to do the next day – even down to the little stuff like washing the dishes. This will take all of those things out of your head and will remove that anxiety around forgetting to do something. You could also keep that list nearby on the off-chance that you do wake up in the middle of the night remembering something else you need to do.

Following these tips should help you get a better night’s sleep, leaving you feeling more energized, your immune system working better, and your body and mind more resilient.

Kick that Cold Naturally

Cold and flu season is here and it seems like it is hitting everyone pretty hard this year. All anyone wants to do when they’re sick is feel better. The fact is that there are over 200 different viruses that cause the common cold and there is no cure for any of them. However, there are ways that you can support your body as it fights them off. Here are a health coach’s simple suggestions for natural cold relief.

Eat the Rainbow

Fresh produce is loaded with immune system-supporting compounds call phytonutrients (“phyto” means “plant”). These nutrients give plants their vibrant colors and distinct flavors. There are many, many phytonutrients – so many that we don’t yet know them all nor what they do for our bodies. One thing that we do know is that phytonutrients are rich in antioxidants and other immune-system supporting compounds. They also include anti-inflammatory compounds as well. Inflammation continues to be linked to more and more illnesses and chronic diseases.  To experience the benefits of phytonutrients, eat a variety of fruits and vegetables. An easy way to think of this is eating the rainbow – the more different colors you can eat, the more phytonutrients you’re eating as well!

If you’re feeling under the weather, whipping up a vegetable soup with carrots, onion, celery, sweet potato, and zucchini can help you get those phytos in while soothing your throat and helping with congestion. If the cold feels good on a sore throat, whip up a smoothie with berries and spinach or cauliflower. (Check out this recipe for cauliflower caraway soup!)

Avoid Alcohol

While that hot toddy might sound good, drinking while you’re sick is no way to get better faster for a number of reasons. For one, it can dampen your immune system, making your body less able to fight off that bug. It can also leave you dehydrated, making your congestion worse and leaving you feeling awful. Another reason to skip out on the alcohol is that it disrupt your sleep when your body needs rest to help you recover. Finally, alcohol is inflammatory which can make you feel worse and make your symptoms persist longer.

If you’re sick, stick with water and herbal tea with honey. The honey in it will help soothe your throat and cough. Plus, there is some evidence that certain herbal teas may help alleviate some of your symptoms. When I’m sick, I like a peppermint tea to support my stomach and a lemon-ginger tea for my throat and congestion. Plus, having no caffeine means it won’t disrupt your much-needed sleep. These options will also help keep you hydrated.

Move!

Our blood vessels are lined with special cells called the endothelium. The endothelium is like your body’s own pharmacy in that it releases a number of different medicinal compounds into your bloodstream as is needed. When you exercise, it increases the blood flow through your blood vessels and over the endothelium, thereby prompting it to release more of those medicines. This is why sometimes when you feel a cold coming on, you feel better after going for a walk. Additionally, regular exercise can help produce new blood vessels further improving your circulation and your health.

Obviously, there is a balance needed here. If you’re sick, going for an intense run or taking a HIIT fitness class is probably going to make you feel sicker. Remember, exercise, while beneficial, is also a stressor on your body. Keep this in mind and listen to your body. If you’re feeling terrible, skip that walk and stay in bed.

Rest Up

In the simplest sense, our bodies need just 4 things: nutrition, movement, water, and rest. Sleep deprivation suppresses your immune system, so the more exhausted you are, the more likely you are to get sick and the harder is will be for you to recover. In today’s fast-paced busy world, rest is one of the most important factors for natural cold relief.

To make sure you are getting sufficient and quality sleep, avoid simple carbohydrates and big meals in the evening. As we said before, that glass of wine before bed might help you fall asleep, but it will disrupt your sleep later in the night, so skip out on the alcohol as well. It’s also important that you sleep in a dark room and keep all devices out of the bedroom – just looking at your cell phone screen in the middle of the night will disrupt production of your sleep hormones.

Avoid Sugar and Processed Foods

Added sugar and the additives found in processed foods can act as inflammatories on your body making you feel worse and your symptoms persist longer. They are also lacking in the nutrients that your body needs to recover while being heavy in calories. Focus on keeping it simple with whole foods. Some lighter options if your stomach is bothering you are: dry whole grain toast, brown rice,  oatmeal, soup/broth and sweet potato. If you’re feeling well stomach-wise, dark leafy greens, broccoli, and fruit are great options.

Very often, people resort to orange juice when they’re sick thinking they’re getting a megadose of Vitamin C that will magically cure them. You’re better off avoiding the juice since there is no fiber in it, leaving you with just sugar. If you want to have Vitamin C, opt for whole foods before juice.

*Please note that I am not a doctor and the above information is not to be construed as medical advice. Always consult a doctor when you are concerned about your symptoms.