The Trouble with the Diet Mentality

More than any of the junk food on the market, I think the biggest obstacle to having healthy balanced eating habits, a good relationship with our body, and a healthy relationship with food is the diet mentality. In order to start truly making lasting changes to your eating habits, you have to start working on curbing that mentality from the outset.

What is the Diet Mentality

The diet mentality is a deeply ingrained way of thinking in our culture that emphasizes black-and-white thinking about eating habits. You hear it in the on-the-wagon-off-the-wagon notion and the idea of “good” foods versus “bad” foods. You hear it in the way we talk about our eating behaviors: “I was bad today because I had chips and dessert.” And it’s behind our negative self-talk when we pick apart our physical appearance, berate ourselves for not following our diet, and say cruel things about our bodies.

The diet mentality is critical for the survival of the commercial diet industry because it supports their unsustainable programs which focus solely on the food, counting calories, carbs, and points, and the number on the scale and ignore balance, the reasons behind our eating habits, and food quality.

Why the Diet Mentality is a Problem

The diet mentality is a big problem for a whole number of reasons. First and foremost, all of that negative self-talk and those unrealistic goals that it emphasizes throw us into a self-defeating, self-berating spiral.

Let me explain. Commercial diets rely on one common ingredient for all of their programs: self-control. Here’s the thing about self-control, it’s a finite resource for every single human being out there. It erodes throughout the course of the day, with stress, with lack of sleep, and the longer we rely on it. However, we are conditioned to believe that when we run out of the ability to exercise self-control, it’s a failure on our part. We are simply not good enough, not strong enough, not cut out for this. Have you ever had those thoughts about yourself?

Pretty much anyone who has withstood the diet cycle has had those thoughts. And what those thoughts ultimately lead to are beliefs that we are simply not good enough so why bother even trying. “Well, I already blew it today, so why not just go all in for dinner, dessert, and wine?” “I just can’t do it. What’s the point in even trying?” “I didn’t have the self control for no carbs….but maybe if I’m counting points instead that’ll be easier”.

This is the diet mentality at work. It make you feel bad about yourself, warps your self-image, and keeps you coming back for more and more diets.

Here’s the thing…

The diet mentality does not reflect reality. There are no good foods and bad foods – just food. There are foods you shouldn’t eat as often because they aren’t as nutritious, true. But eating those foods certainly doesn’t make you bad any more than eating a carrot would make Charles Manson good. See what I’m saying?

The goal that we all need to be working towards is BALANCE so that we can enjoy those treats that we like but also eat plenty of the more nutritious foods that our bodies need. The goal is BALANCE so that we can enjoy food without equating it with our worth, so that we can stop berating ourselves and heal our relationships with food and with our bodies.

Releasing the Diet Mentality

Only by working on quelling those diet mentality thoughts and beliefs can we focus on achieving that balance that we need. But it takes time because that mentality is so deeply ingrained not only in ourselves but also in our society. It’s all around us and we don’t even notice it most of the time. So it takes practice noticing those patterns and then flipping the script on them.

So here’s a homework assignment if you’re willing: grab a journal and write down the diet mentality thoughts and feelings you have today on one side of the page. On the other side of the page, flip the script on them, turn them into something constructive or more observational and not judgmental. For example “I was bad today because I ate a whole bag of chips” could be flipped to “I ate a bag of chips today and they tasted really good.” “I can’t eat bread because carbs are bad” could be flipped to “bread isn’t falling in line with the nutritional goals I have today but I can have it if I want it.”

To get you started: your worth is not dictated by the foods you eat. Your body is beautiful and amazing. You are not defective or weak.

Product Review: Boozy Seltzers

Ok. You might be thinking “um, a health coach is reviewing alcohol?” Yes, I am, because I think balance is very important when it comes to health and wellness and, if you want to enjoy a drink occasionally, you should. And so, with that, I give you my take on boozy seltzer.

I’m sure you’ve seen them in the package stores by now, thin, classy-looking cans of spiked seltzers advertising how low-calorie and low-carb they are. I also couldn’t resist and tried them out.

Overall, the alcoholic seltzers out there are typically lower in calories and carbohydrates than the average beer or wine. However, there is a good amount of variation amongst the different brands. I tried 3 of the most popular brands and will tell you about each in order of my least favorite to best.

Truly – least favorite

The Truly brand ranks at the bottom of the boozy seltzers. In terms of nutrition information, Truly are similar to the White Claw brand: a 12-oz can (5% ABV) contains Trulyjust 100 calories, 1 gram of sugar, and 2 grams of carbs, so they really are a low-cal, low-carb option. I also really love that they don’t contain any artificial sweeteners, which have been link to numerous health problems, the full extent of which we still don’t know.

I’ve only had their citrus flavors and I do like the taste. They’re not super sweet or super tart and don’t taste like fake flavoring. What I don’t like about these, and what put them at the bottom for me, is that they are extremely acidic. I actually couldn’t finish the package I bought because every time I drank one I ended up with such awful heartburn that was really difficult to cure. I don’t really have a sensitive stomach and I’ve eaten my share of horrifying food combinations, so this was surprising to me. Seltzer is an acidic drink to begin with so this one is that much more. If you have a sensitive stomach or sensitive teeth, this is something you want to be aware of.

Spiked Seltzer – Runner Up

The runner up in the seltzer game is Spiked Seltzer. These are a bit heavier than the Spiked Seltzerother 2 brands reviewed here. A 12-oz can (6% ABV) contains 140 calories and 5 grams of carbohydrates (sugar info is not listed on their website). This makes it more caloric than a Bud Light (110 cal) and about on par for carbs (6.6 grams). It’s also more caloric than a glass of white wine (120 cal on average) and contains more carbs (4 grams on average). So, really, if you’re looking for a adult beverage with less calories and carbs, this one really isn’t the one you want to go with…at least not if you like Bud Light or white wine more.

In terms of overall yumminess, my favorite flavor is the cranberry. I’ve also had the lemon, lime, and grapefruit. I cared least for the lemon as it tasted kind of fake to me, although there are not any artificial flavors in it. Just not my flavor. All of the flavors are a nice balance between sweet and tart.

White Claw – The Winner!

The White Claw brand is hands-down my favorite. A 12-oz can (5% ABV) contains 100 White Clawcalories and 2 grams of carbohydrates and sugar, making it a nice, light option. Of the three brands, I like the taste of this one the best. The black cherry flavor is my favorite and the lime flavor is a close second. They all taste natural, aren’t super sweet, and don’t have a harsh, acidic bite. Like the other two flavors, White Claw contains no artificial flavors, sweeteners, or preservatives. This is the brand of boozy seltzer you will find me sitting around the campfire with.

As a health coach, I have to say that, if you want to have a little boozy indulgence, alcohol-spiked seltzers are a good option to go with without tipping the scales. Cheers!